Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Baloha resignation could be time bomb..

Having sensationally resigned, how much kompromat has Baloha taken out of the president's secretariat? According to Vasyl Baziv, [remember him? - he was one of those who sneered about Yushchenko's poisoning in 2004] Baloha could blow the whistle on the president.

Baloha claims Yushchenko: "has no moral right to run for president again." So if Yushchenko does so, will Baloha 'reveal all the dirt'?

Meanwhile, there are major divisions looming in PoR between the Donetskiites and the Luhanskiites [Dons and Lugs]..

Update: According to 'ProUA', "Ex-head of president's secretariat to drown Party of Region's leader's rivals in kompromat..." "Backstabber" Baloha is not wasting any time then..


Anonymous said...

If Baloha spill the beans on the President then he would be doing the nation a service.

Baloha is correct when he says that Yushchenko should not run for a second term. He nomination would only harm the chances of Yatseniuk being elected success and assist Yanukovch's campaign to win

Yushchenko should resign to allow for an October Presidential elction. Five years on from the 2004 elections.

His attempt top cling on to power and force Ukraine to the polls in the midst of Ukraine's bitter cold winter with temperatures as low as minus 20 is not in Ukraine;'s best interest.

Ukraine should have a fixed date for elections and the term of office should never exceed five years.

rupiawan said...

Yushchenko poisoning? I can show you her biography

elmer said...

I hope you don't mind if I get off topic for just a second.

Here is a memorial minute for a Ukrainian at Harvard - and the world.

A prodigious scholar.

From the Harvard University Gazette:


Omeljan Pritsak
Faculty of Arts and Sciences — Memorial Minute
At a Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences May 5, 2009, the following Minute was placed upon the records.

Omeljan Pritsak was a man of seemingly inexhaustible energy, broad erudition, and total dedication to scholarship in a broad range of fields. While he will probably be best remembered at Harvard and in the Ukrainian diaspora community as the co-founder and long-time director of Harvard’s Ukrainian Research Institute, his energy, erudition, and scholarship also found expression in a prodigious output of scholarly work and in institution-building in several countries and many scholarly fields. He was founder, editor, or an early stalwart of a number of periodical and monographic series—first in Germany, then in this country, and, ultimately, in his native Ukraine. His prodigious range and productivity is only partially captured by the published bibliographies of his works.

Pritsak was born on 7 April 1919 in Luka, in the Sambir region of Ukraine, and completed his secondary education at the Polish “First Gymnasium” of Ternopil’, where for some years he was the only Ukrainian student. His higher education, with a concentration in Ukrainian and, increasingly over time, Turkic history and philology, took place at the University of L’viv, at the Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in Kyiv, and, after World War II (during which he became first a Red Army soldier, then a prisoner of war, then an Ost-Arbeiter), at the Universities of Berlin and Göttingen, the latter of which awarded him a doctorate in 1948.

Pritsak was invited to visit Harvard University for the academic year 1960–61 and returned to Harvard as Professor of Linguistics and Turcology in 1964. He retired in 1989.

By the time of his arrival in Cambridge, Pritsak had already become an internationally recognized specialist in historical and comparative Turkic and Altaic linguistics and a leading authority on the history and cultures of the Eurasian steppe.

In 1967 Pritsak proposed the creation of a firm foundation for the development of Ukrainian studies at Harvard through the establishment of three endowed chairs (history, literature, and philology) and a research institute. This project was accomplished thanks to the efforts of the Ukrainian Studies Fund, which raised the necessary funds within the North-American Ukrainian diaspora community. The Ukrainian Research Institute was founded in 1973 and Pritsak became its first director. In 1975 he was named to the new Hrushevs’kyi Chair in Ukrainian history.

After retirement, Pritsak became more involved in the post-Soviet struggle for the revival of academic historical studies in Ukraine, spending increasing amounts of his time there (despite a serious cardiac condition that had led to surgery as early as 1977). He became the first elected foreign member of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, and revived the Institute of Oriental Studies in Kyiv, introducing new university-level programs in that field and many other neglected areas of historical scholarship. Sadly, however, even a man of his astuteness and dynamism was unable to escape the tangled webs of post-Soviet academic politics and intrigue: these years were filled with disappointments.

By that time, however, Pritsak’s major work had been accomplished. It has transformed our understanding of East Slavic history.
Respectfully submitted,

Michael S. Flier
Richard N. Frye
George G. Grabowicz
Roman Szporluk
Edward L. Keenan, Chair

Anonymous said...

Mindless giberish.

elmer said...

Here's an interesting video -

In Ukraine, there is no Foreign Minister or Interior Minister currently.

And Tymoshenko is trying to get rid of Defense Minister Yekhanurov.

George Miroshnichenko was in Washington DC for an anti-corruption program.

He is with the Party of Regions.

He gave a short interview to Myroslava Gongadze, in Ukrainian, at the Voice of America.

She noted that it's impossible currently to imagine Ukraine without a political crisis.

He called Tymoshenko's government "unprofessional" but "well-intentioned."

He quoted the old saying "the road to hell is paved with good intentions."

And then touted the "professionalism" and "expertise" and "new faces" of the Party of Regions, including Fearless Leader and ProFFesor - Yanukovych.

He claims that noone in Ukraine should be afraid of "open discussion."

The presidential campaign is ongoing, it appears.